the Thinking Chicks Guide to Movies

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The Crow (1994)

Reviewed on 2007 November 7

Man, I should have been Myca for Halloween.

Eric Draven (Brandon Lee) and his fiancee Shelly (Sofia Shinas) are the rare people you’d actually want for neighbors in their rough part of town. They’re compassionate enough to take care of a neglected daughter of a junkie, and Eric is a talented rock musician too. They even turned their floor in their old, decrepit building into a functional, attractive apartment. It’s Goth and pretty, and if they can get their neighbors on board, the whole building will look good, and they’ll be spared eviction.

Unfortunately, the last good deed gets them killed. The building is owned by a thug named Top Dollar (Michael Wincott), who wants to torch the thing for insurance money. He dispatches his goons to teach Eric and Shelly a lesson. They’re brutally murdered on Devil’s Night or October 30th, also the night before what was to be their wedding. Love never dies, and apparently rage doesn’t either. Eric comes back from the grave to avenge their deaths.

This is dark revenge film, figuratively and literally. It’s not for everyone but I thought it was very well-made (though painfully sad at times) and visually arresting. The plot is simple and effective, though you may want a comedy chaser after watching this. This was the nastiest real estate I’ve seen outside of one of the Robocop movies — it says a lot about the place when a cop realizes he’s talking to a vengeance-dealing spectre and just sort of accepts it. And the baddies were psychotic and evil, even when they don’t have much to say. Bai Ling is very creepy as Myca, who doesn’t do much but stand around in stuff from the Edwardian Edition Victoria’s Secret and indulge one disturbing habit.

Three chocolate morsels.

Shukti

morsel morsel morsel

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